Studio

Tag: Studio

39 articles

How do you choose a typeface when you’re the world’s biggest font foundry?

Monotype’s brand refresh needed to achieve the same consistency of communication that it champions for its customers. But what’s the answer when you’re a type foundry with literally tens of thousands of fonts to choose from, and multiple products and services to design for?

Talking creative collaboration with UK Type Director Tom Foley.

Today’s creative departments and agencies have their hands full. Marketing in the digital age is a constant juggling act, and requires more improvisation and adaptability than ever before. No surprise, then, that’s it’s also more important—and more difficult—than ever to keep your teams aligned and working together.

Meet Tom Foley.

We’d like to introduce the newest member of the Monotype team, Tom Foley. As Creative Type Director, Tom will lead the Studio team in London. He took a few minutes to talk about fonts, exciting challenges in type design, and why he loves DIY home renovation.

Charles Nix Tells the Story of Helvetica Now.

Helvetica® is perhaps the best-known typeface of all time, inspiring designers across multiple generations and around the world. Recently, Monotype’s Studio team released Helvetica® Now, a reimagination available in three optical sizes - Micro, Text, and Display. Every character has been redrawn and refit; with a variety of useful alternatives added.

What do designers think of Helvetica Now?

During the recent launch of Helvetica® Now at Monotype’s New York City office, Charles Nix, Type Director at Monotype presented the process for redesigning this truly iconic typeface.

The Story of Adlam.

In this day and age, imagine someone inventing a new alphabet for a language so that it fits the sounds better than the current one. How likely is it to succeed in being adopted and replacing the old alphabet?

Meet Placard Next.

Placard Next is a reimagined version of a 1930s poster design, that takes all the original quirky details and refines them for digital use. Its condensed versions pack an instant typographic punch when used at large sizes, introducing some unusual flavor to posters, headlines and anywhere else designers need to make a statement.

Right place, right time.

In the 60-plus years since Max Miedinger, Eduard Hoffmann, and the Haas Type Foundry unleashed Helvetica upon the world, the typeface has delighted, dismayed, captivated, and confounded the design community.

Creating the typeface for SAP Fiori.

Monotype’s Terrance Weinzierl helped software company SAP to develop a typeface for SAP Fiori, for which SAP won a Red Dot Award in 2015. It was important that the design of the typeface works well in text-based UI environments without compromising on personality. The new typeface, called 72, has won a 2017 Red Dot Award.

A digital-ready Chinese sans-serif is born.

Many Chinese typefaces have a reputation for looking dated and not reading easily on small screens— not M Ying Hei. It checks all the boxes that it’s forefathers can’t.

Tazugane Gothic.

The first Japanese typeface from Monotype is a humanist sans serif, designed to work in partnership with Neue Frutiger. Tazugane Gothic sets out to introduce a new typographic standard, allowing designers to comfortably set Latin and Japanese characters alongside one another while maintaining visual harmony.

Meet Hope Sans.

Hope Sans has been selected by the judges of the 22nd Annual TDC Typeface Design Competition to receive the Certificate of Typographic Excellence. It will be included in the Annual of the Type Directors Club, “The World’s Best Typography,” and will also be shown at the 65th Awards Exhibition (TDC65) in New York City.

Introducing Sagrantino.

Sagrantino is a non-connecting script that traces its roots back to hand-drawn letterforms, and the connection between pen and paper. Named after the Italian wine, Sagrantino is bold and full of flavor, while embodying a sense of freedom and fluidity. Its quirky character shines at larger sizes – making it perfect for headlines, posters, or anywhere type is needed to really make a point. The family is available as OpenType Pro fonts, and has an extended character set that supports most Central European and many Eastern European languages.

Meet VAG Rounded Next.

This extended version of the VAG Rounded typeface by the Monotype Studio brings the 1970s design up to date, expanding its language support and adding two new display fonts.

Introducing Amariya.

Created with screen reading in mind, Amariya’s sculpted, understated elegance is specifically designed for long-form copy in Arabic, Urdu or Persian. Its open shapes and streamlined forms are tailored not just to the digital world, but the flow and rhythm required by someone immersing themselves in words.

Neue Kabel: reshaping a lost classic.

Neue Kabel brings back the liveliness of the original's strikingly quirky characters, while adding in the long-lost italics and missing glyphs needed for it to address a wide range of editorial and branding purposes.

The story of PMN Caecilia Sans.

The making of the serif typeface PMN Caecilia from first sketches to usable fonts took more than seven years. Designed by Peter Matthias Noordzij, it is the child of a time when font technology changed rapidly, not knowing which development the next day would bring. Eventually it was released in 1991 and quickly turned into a quiet tip for designers; not overused, and yet selected for prominent applications. Today, more than 25 years later, Noordzij adds a sans serif companion to his first type family and equips it for today’s needs.

How fonts give voice to a destination

When exploring your next destination, take note of the typography you see guiding you through the place. How are the fonts connected to your perception of the city and its identity? Do they add to your experience? What story does the city’s typography tell?