Tag: Creative matters

22 articles

Creative Characters Ep. 9: Angelina Lippert, Posterhouse.

Creative Type Director Charles Nix talks with Angelina Lippert, Chief Curator at the Posterhouse museum in New York City, about the history of poster design, the unseen hands behind some of the more iconic posters from history, and the finicky wonder of Rubylith.

Creative Characters Ep. 8: John Norman.

Our guest in episode eight was John Norman, a celebrated visual storyteller and former Chief Creative Officer of world-renowned creative agencies like Translation, The Martin Agency, and most recently, Havas Chicago.

Creative Characters Ep. 7: Sarah Hyndman.

In episode six we talked with Chris Do, award-winning designer, CEO and Chief Strategist of Blind and the founder of The Futur—an online education platform that teaches creatives how to make a living doing what they love.

Creative Characters Ep. 6: Chris Do.

In episode six we talked with Chris Do, award-winning designer, CEO and Chief Strategist of Blind and the founder of The Futur—an online education platform that teaches creatives how to make a living doing what they love.

Creative Characters Ep. 5: Terrence Williams.

In episode five we talked with Terrence Williams, Senior Design Lead at Salesforce, who discusses the emergence of relationship design, and shares why it is important for people to bring their full identities into their work.

Creative Characters Ep. 4: Tré Seals.

In episode four we talked with Tré Seals, founder of Vocal Type, about his efforts to break down stereotypes in design and how a middle-school side gig, born out of a brush with serious childhood medical issues, helped him become the artist he is today.

Creative Characters Ep. 2: Scott Starrett.

In our second episode, Monotype Creative Type Director Charles Nix talked with Scott Starret, co-founder of the design studio Tandem NYC, about serendipity and the experience of designing for a transformational political candidate.

Creative Characters Ep. 1: James Sommerville.

In our first episode, we talked with James Sommerville, co-founder of KNOWN_UNKOWN, about his ideas for the future of creative work, community, and work/life balance in a post-pandemic world.

Creative Characters Ep. 3: Jenna Blazevich.

In episode three we talked with Chicago-based lettering artist Jenna Blazevich, about chain stitching, punk rock, intersectional feminism, and whatever the heck Malört is.

Sustainability: a way forward for brands, a challenge for design.

Today, it is a moral imperative that companies and agencies prioritize sustainable, environmentally friendly principles and practices. More and more consumers are demanding that brands act responsibly when it comes to environmental concerns. But what role does visual communication play in this topic, and how can type and design contribute to good sustainability practices?

Why it pays to pay for creativity.

Artists pour their heart and soul into their craft and creations and in an ideal world, every artist would be recognized and paid appropriately for their efforts. In reality, however, artists often have to fight for their rights to be upheld. This has been true for centuries and is only intensifying in the digital era.

Announcing the 2020 Type Champions!

Monotype is thrilled to introduce the recipients of the second annual Type Champions Award, a program that recognizes brands for their creative, innovative, and memorable use of typography in developing and maintaining their brand identities.

Monotype announces a collaboration with House Industries.

We’re very excited to announce a partnership between Monotype and House Industries, a revered, eclectic design studio that has worked with The New Yorker, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Design Within Reach, and many other iconic identities. Beginning immediately, House Industries fonts can now be licensed through Monotype’s enterprise account teams, with a standard process that is already used by many leading global brands.

Typography and modern protest.

At its core, type is a storyteller. Letterforms deliver a message. And such messages are perhaps at their purest in the form of community-led designs for protest.

Is it time to rethink how creative work gets done?

We’ve spent a lot of time thinking about the effect the pandemic has had on the collaborative process that drives creative work at companies everywhere. Here are some ideas about where things could be heading. 

The Time Is Now.

No matter how you look at it, 2020 will be a year that is studied in the history books. From a global pandemic, to economic instability, to mental health challenges, all of us are finding ourselves navigating an increasingly challenging and frightening world.

How brands can stand out amidst the digital noise.

With seemingly every business in the world launching apps, online services, and other digital properties as they cope with disruptions from the COVID crisis, many brands are likely wondering how they can stand out from all the sudden digital noise.

How design and creativity can help meet this moment.

Perhaps the biggest challenge is not figuring out how to return to whatever “normal” used to look like, but how to let go of the vision we held for the future we thought we’d have.